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An Excursion to Rajahmundry

It was quite hot when we left by bus to Rajahmundry last Tuesday afternoon. An Indian friend told me that it is about 7 degrees above the average temperature in January – and we felt it.

I enjoy these bus rides – a good occasion for some in-depth talk to a friend or just looking out to the countryside.The only interruption was a short coffee break somewhere at a palm forest. When dusk set in I saw that quite a number of the “youngsters” in the other bus, which was driving before us had started dancing – I smiled and thought of “Bollywood”…

It took about 5.5 hs – the bus was old and there was quite some traffic on the roads. I asked myself whether in India they drive on the left or the right side – no way to discover…

The WTT brotherhood gave us a warm welcome and a delicious dinner – and we quickly fell to sleep – “camping” in a big hall.

Early next morning I went to the nearby Godavari River to have an early morning “holy bath” in one of the most holy rivers of India. Sri Kumar explained that it is charged with leonine energies and that every 12 years there is a huge Kumbha Mela in the month of Leo. Luckily it was dark when we went into the river – during daylight the water turned out to be more dirty than in the previous years. Nevertheless, the etheric purity and radiance does not depend much on the physical. I hope that soon some people get the idea that it might be good to clear the plastic bottles. In the water I stumbled upon a net and some clothes…

After morning meditation we welcomed the Sun on the roof of the WTT centre before we set out to a journey to Amalavaram. We drove through a lush nature with a lot of plant and tree nurseries. There is an extensive irrigation system and the area is very rich and fertile.

After over 2 hs drive we arrived at the town of Amalavaram, where some old members of the WTT had invited the group. Mr Murti Ganti, a retired professor of nuclear physics and his big family gave Sri Kumar and us a warm welcome with coffee and some sweets. We then set out to a tour by walk through the village. First we walked to the temple of Rajalakshmi, the village goddess. Sri Kumar explained that all town there have a protective deity looking over the well-being of the people and newcomers greeting first this deity.

Then we proceeded to an old Shiva and a Vishnu temple, where small ceremonies were conducted. There was a vibrant energy around. I just stood for a while in a stream of light, thrilled. Afterward we visited the central family house of the Murti’s – a house built over 100 years ago according tot he ancient science of Vastu. Mr. Murti explained the principles of this house and how it protects against the high temperatures – with a covering of dried coconuts, among others. There was no iron used in these houses, iron having the energy of Kali, the dark Iron Age.

After a sumptuous lunch at the family house and some coconuts in a huge coconut plantation we returned to Rajahmundry.

Next morning, after another bath in the river, meditation and breakfast we made a small tour through the temple quarter along the river. Sri Kumar explained us how the whole area had developed over the last 40 years, with the central impulsion coming from the WTT and the substantial services rendered by the local group.

We first visited a Dattatreya temple of the Dattapeetam movement, where a smal ritual was conducted, then proceeded to the Hare Krishna temple, a beautiful construction, a Kartikeya (Mars) temple with very martian energies, the bath place at teh river and anotehr temple dedicated to Gayatri, the World Mother. Then we set out to a 2 hs boatride with some members of the India brotherhood. They made a kind of lotto with us and wanted us to dance. I felt a bit reminded of my disco times in the 70s – though I would have preferred just to enjoy the river ambiance I decided to participate…

After lunch we again started our return journey, arriving quite tired around 7.30 pm.

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